Redesigns and Refreshes: Why Change is Crucial

 

Each year, new design trends emerge. It’s important for businesses to keep up with these changes in order to remain competitive, and those that are really good at it can even position themselves as change leaders within their industry. As our Director of Business Development, Kory Grushka, put it: “Be very curious and stay on top of the latest trends and news – particularly in your industry, but also outside of it.”

Adjusting to Fit the Times

 

 

 

 

 

Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory completely rebranded their packaging and store design to better fit in with today’s aesthetic style and feel. Graphic design studio, Wedge & Lever, took advantage of the new chocolate culture by giving the branding an upscale feel, with a color palette inspired by the chocolate itself.

Rebranding Efforts Often Lead to Huge Success

 

If a brand has become outdated, is declining in sales, or needs to stand apart from the competition, then a rebrand can provide the facelift they need to bring the right attention to the product. Rebranding also keeps customers interested and shows them that people are still hard at work behind the scenes making sure the product is the best out there.

 

Target proved this when they updated their generic Market Pantry packaging to give it a hip, trendy vibe. It now feels like a standalone brand, rather than an affordable generic pick.

 

Each product has its own detailed packaging, down to the type. The heavy typography feels fresh, like something that could be seen on a Brooklyn storefront. The badges for health feel like modern stamps now, instead of boring nutrition facts or your typical callout.

 

 

The Crunchy Oats & Honey Granola Bars now have honey dripping onto the top of the type. With the Toasted Rounds Baked Crackers, the “O” and the round portion of the “D” have treatment that feels like the edge of the cracker. The mixed fruit flavored snacks now have the typography as the teeth of smiling grapes to appeal to kids. On the Woven Wheat crackers box, the type is written so that it looks like parts are weaving in the crackers.

 

Some products (like the marshmallows) are transparent with only the logo and bold type showing, letting the product be the star of the show, and saving ink at the printer in the process. Other products, such as the butter, half and half, cottage cheese, and American singles have very flat packaging focusing on the typography alone.

Holiday Packaging

 

Changing packaging to fit a holiday, theme, or season can lead to huge profits. It can make your product stand apart from the competition and help build brand loyalty with your target audience.

Learn to Accept Change

 

 

While redesigning Campbell Soup Company’s V8 packaging, our research process included multiple store visits to each of the three club store retailers, significant desktop research and interviews of club store industry experts. Further, we audited cross-category products as well as the beverage category, and conducted extensive color studies that ultimately informed the variety differentiation strategy. The final designs focused on color blocking, bold callouts for the brand, varieties and pack sizes, and photo-realistic 3D renderings of the products.

Change can be scary, and with the risks that it carries, it’s easy to see why. But with a clear vision and full understanding of trends and modernity, the resulting redesign should successfully bring a design into the present day.

Top 5 Easter Designs

It can be difficult to create unique Easter packaging designs that can stand up to a sea of pastel treats. With so much competition around the holiday, it takes a lot to grab a consumer’s attention.

Fortunately, each of the designs highlighted below has found a way to create unique, out-of-the-box packaging designs that stand apart from the traditional Easter packaging. Most importantly, they illustrate that Easter designs can mean more than the traditional eggs, bunnies, and carrots.

1. Hotel Chocolat

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The Supermilk Facet Easter Egg by Hotel Chocolat needed to have a truly unique design to stand up to their new chocolate line. This Easter egg contains more cocoa and less sugar for a healthier, more guilt-free option. In order to attract consumers to this new gem of an egg, the design needed to take an unexpected angle on the classic Easter egg. It accomplished this by casting the egg itself with a jeweled facet design to represent a “chocolate diamond emerging from a smooth chocolate eggshell”. The outer packaging also illustrates this jeweled facet design.

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The Splat Easter Egg is another masterfully crafted Easter egg design from Hotel Chocolat. It features eye-catching pastel packaging with a colorful chocolate splat to emphasize that this is a grown-up kids’ treat.

2. Van Leeuwen

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After redesigning its packaging to traditional Easter colors, the high-end Brooklyn ice cream brand, Van Leeuwen, enjoyed a 50% increase in sales. For the redesign, they focused on making something that “looks good on social media”. The company worked with design firm Pentagram to design the ice cream trucks and pints to look “very Instagrammable”.

3. Lulu Guinness Birdcage Egg

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Designer Lulu Guinness specially crafted only 100 of these limited-edition birdcage eggs for Fortnum & Mason. The packaging is meant to mix old-school glamour with modern design in order to reflect the designer’s love of all things English. Each label was signed by the designer and the box was decorated by hand for that special touch, making it an extra special gift.

4. Tesco Finest

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Tesco Finest worked with branding and packaging design specialist, Parker Williams, to create unique designs that combine modern style and vintage designs. The custom-made egg coop is successful at “catching the consumer eye whilst placing an emphasis on the eggs”. The design comes complete with a netted metal front and wooden box.

5. Toblerone

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Toblerone focused on creating Easter packaging that would appeal to adults just as much as it would to kids. This successful packaging concept was designed to create high visibility on a crowded shelf. The colorful pattern was inspired by the brand’s elements, as well as the chocolate treats hidden inside.

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Toblerone also worked with Bultmann Design Works to create the seasonal packaging displaying an open-the-flap element and rabbit characters to entice younger consumers. It also fits well in any Easter basket.

 

The History of Holiday Flavors

Screen Shot 2016-11-23 at 10.11.54 AMThere’s no way around it — 2016 has been a strange year.

Olympic athletes swam in questionable green pools. Clowns terrorized the nation for over a month. Pringles has three different dessert-flavored chips out at once… Screen Shot 2016-11-23 at 9.47.43 AM

Photo from Pringles’ official twitter

Pecan Pie, Sugar Cookie, and Salted Caramel. Count ‘em, that’s three sweet Pringles for the holiday season – limited edition, of course, as are most gimmicky flavored snacks.

Now that we are about midway through the season in which everything from chips to ChapStick has to have some pumpkin spice/gingerbread/peppermint variation, we can’t help but wonder…how did we get to this point?

Oreos are probably the treat best associated with limited edition flavors. After all, their experiments in novelty cookies are not just bound by holidays – they play the game all year long, with nearly ten new selections produced in 2016 alone (including Swedish Fish and Lemon Twist). Consumers could first buy a limited edition Oreo in 1985, when the company debuted the decidedly mild and normal Mint Crème.

Since then, it has been the Wild West in the snack flavoring world. Most companies seem to stick to the holiday season for major shakeups, and all traditional taste conventions go flying out the window the minute the temperature starts dropping. It isn’t just savory foods going sweet – in 1994, Jones Soda put out Turkey and Gravy cola (imagine the possibilities, Pringles!), and it was only a few years ago that Accoutrements put out a Thanksgiving gumball pack that included turkey-flavored gumballs.

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Photo from Amazon

Of course, the most pervasive and beloved flavor of the season is pumpkin spice. The first reference to pumpkin spice is believed to have come from the 1796 cookbook American Cookery by Amelia Simmons, and the recipe called for molasses, allspice and ginger. McCormick’s and similar brands shortened the name of their spice blend from “pumpkin pie spice” to just “pumpkin spice” as early as the 1960s, after the blend had been on the market for a decade. Trader Joe’s began carrying seasonal pumpkin goods in the mid-90’s, and as the flavor continues to get more and more popular, their selection grows – there will be ten more pumpkin-themed items for sale this year than last year. Pop-Tarts, cream cheese, vodka, cereal, bagels, coffee creamer, popcorn, even salsa and hummus – all can be found in a pumpkin spice variety this fall.

Starbucks is largely responsible for the phenomenon, as their pumpkin spice latte, which has been around for thirteen years, is by far their most popular seasonal item. They have sold over two hundred million “PSLs” since the drink debuted, earning hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue for the company. Social media has played a huge role in this, so much so that the drink has its own separate verified Twitter account: @TheRealPSL.

This is not to say that seasonal flavors are all about the traditional – at the height of the cupcake craze of the early 2010s, Target released a popular “holiday milk” flavored like chocolate red velvet. So there is definitely room for brands to incorporate trends into their seasonal flavor selections, and we should expect to see more creativity in the coming years. After all, 1796-2016 is a long reign for pumpkin spice. If Pringles has given us any indication, future tastes can be unexpected.

7 Tips to Make Your Holiday Packaging Memorable

This time of year millions and millions of Americans rev up their holiday engines and get into the holiday spirit. In line with that spirit, it has become increasingly common to see themed holiday packaging on the shelves, for short-run and/or limited edition products.  Given that, brands shouldn’t just get into the spirit – they should capitalize on it. Now that we are in the stretch run to the holidays, we thought it was appropriate to list some of our favorite ways to make your holiday packaging stand out.

1. Add Non-Religious Holiday Elements

Limited Edition Packaging DesignLimited Edition PackagingYou don’t need to choose a certain holiday or religion to get in the holiday spirit. Stick with things like holiday color palettes, traditional holiday decorations, and non-religious characters, like snowmen. This will appeal to a mass audience and will help you steer clear of alienating any particular group.

2. Make It a GiftLimited Edition Packaging Design

Everything from a small bag of candy to an expensive trip around the world can be given as a gift. Whether your product could be considered a stocking stuffer or the main event, make sure it can be given as a gift. For instance, by simply changing your packaging to a red and green, silver and gold, or blue and white theme to welcome the winter holidays, you can make your product instantly giftable. Consider also adding a gift name tag with a blank “To:” and “From:”

3. Create a Gift Set

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Gift sets are an easy made for convenient gifting, and that is why they always tend to pop up around this time of year. If you have a somewhat varied product line and can combine a numerous products into a complementary set, that may be your best bet.  Alternatively, the gift set concept also provides an opportunity to experiment with co-branding by adding complementary products from third party companies.

4. Go Limited Edition

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Everyone wants to feel like they got (or gifted) an exclusive item. By creating limited edition packaging design for a particular holiday, your customers can feel like they received something truly unique that will be available for a limited time only. Find a way to make your customers feel special.

5. Make It Luxurious

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This is the time of year when people want to feel luxurious. They want to give gifts that make their loved ones feel special. Taking your packaging up a notch at this time of year may cost a bit extra, but shoppers are usually willing to pay it during the holidays.  Pearlescent or other specialty inks, innovative dielines, unique packaging structures and engraved/embossed lettering can take a pedestrian package and luxurify it.

6. Pre-Giftwrap It

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If possible, use the outer packaging as a type of giftwrap. This will help shoppers instantly identify the product as a holiday item, while encouraging them to purchase the item with a gifting purpose in mind.

7. Bold, Colorful Packaging for Kids and AdultsLimited Edition Packaging DesignLimited Edition Packaging Design

Colorful packaging with bold, light-hearted illustration will almost always stand out in a crowd. Children are also more drawn to friendly colorful packaging, so choosing holiday themes and elements during the specific time of year can appeal to both kids and their parents.