10 Trends from the 2017 Summer Fancy Food Show [Video]

 

 

In our first installment of our video series, we take a look at all of the trends that we spotted at the 2017 Summer Fancy Food Show.

For our written coverage of the event, check out our article at: http://worksdesigngroup.com/7-trends-2017-summer-fancy-food-show/

 

 

 

 

Top 5 Designs from the Fast Food Industry

How do you enhance the customer experience when it comes to fast food? Whether it is a viral campaign or innovative packaging, great fast food design can boost sales and even make people feel better about what they’re eating.

We know that great typography, color schemes, and the overall feel of fast food packaging can improve the dining experience for customers, but some designs really go above and beyond to take the meal to the next level. Here are five creative fast food designs that we think break the mold.

Burger King’s Proud Whopper

 

 

In celebration of the San Francisco Gay Pride Parade, Burger King debuted a “new” menu item called the “Proud Whopper.” While it was really just a normal Whopper with a colorful wrapper, some customers noted that they tasted flavors that aren’t typically present in the signature sandwich, such as sweetness, making a case for the relationship between packaging and the placebo effect.

The wrapper doubled as a rainbow peace flag, with bold copy proclaiming that “WE ARE ALL THE SAME INSIDE.” The campaign was a viral success, with over one billion media impressions and $21 million in earned media amongst seven million views. It also had 450,000 blog mentions and became the number one trending topic on Facebook and Twitter.

Dunkin’ Donuts Chameleon Cup

 

 

Dunkin’ Donuts worked with designer Tiago Pinto to come up with a solution to a problem that plagues many coffee sellers: how to communicate that the beverage could be dangerously hot in a concise, attractive way.

They wanted to add value to the customer’s experience while making sure that design played a central role in the message’s execution. They came up with a brilliant coffee cup that warns drinkers when the beverage is too hot. A temperature sensitive paint is activated when the temperature of the inside of the cup rises above 70°c. When the coffee cools, the cup turns to Dunkin’s normal white cup and iconic logo.

 

Pizza Hut’s Blockbuster Box

 

 

Is there a more iconic pairing than pizza and movies? Ogilvy Hong Kong recognized the value of this match and created a genius marketing endeavor to combine the two with the Blockbuster Box.

The Blockbuster Box contains a special plastic “pizza table” that keeps the greasy goods away from the walls of the box. The table has a built-in lens, which can be slotted through a perforated hole on the side of the box.

Once you’ve inserted the lens into the side of the pizza box, you’ll need a smartphone to power the experience. After you place your smartphone in the center of the Blockbuster Box, the lens will magnify your smartphone’s display and project it onto the wall.

 

McDonald’s McBike

 

 

With fast food’s general focus on the drive-thru, it can be easy for quick service restaurants to neglect their bike-riding customers. McDonald’s is there to make sure that cyclists can enjoy the same nuggets as their driver counterparts.

McDonald’s blatantly ripped off by a concept created by Master’s student Seulbi Kim from Rhode Island School of Design, though version features an additional slit that allows the customer to slide the box through handlebars.

According to her portfolio, “Seulbi created the project as a means to carry fast food more effectively and reduce fast-food packaging by 50%”. She told Business Insider that she was not contacted regarding the bag she designed. “It’s cool to have my design out in the real market but also not really cool to have it copied without my permission,” she told Business Insider. McDonald’s could not be reached to comment on the product design.

 

Taco Bell “Eat Your Words”

 


Canadians are passionate about food, especially the items south of the border that are just out of reach. When Taco Bell announced its new Doritos Locos Taco in the USA, mouths and stomachs across the country were united in a glorious tastebud party. Canada was not invited to that party, and they weren’t afraid to express their frustrations over social media.

Tweets like “Every day that goes by that Canada does not have the Doritos Locos Taco at Taco Bell, I die a little more inside” and “Sure #Canada we get free medicare and shit. BUT wheres the taco’s with Doritos as a shell?” were pouring in.

From those tweets the “Eat your words” campaign was born from Taco Bell in collaboration with Grip Limited agency. Once the Doritos Locos Tacos did finally arrive in the North, it was Taco Bell’s chance to literally make them eat their words. Acquiring marginally-advanced laser technology, they etched some of the more colorful social posts onto the actual taco shell itself.

The campaign went viral, countless DLTs were consumed, and even marked one of the greatest moments of some people’s lives.

Next time you are out grubbing on fast food, think of ways that designers could make it a better experience for customers and let us know if you have any ideas.

Yum: Ruby Chocolate and the History of Chocolate Innovation

On Tuesday, September 5th, 2017, Swiss chocolate manufacturer Barry Callebaut announced in a press release that they had invented a brand-new type of chocolate. Called “ruby chocolate” after its natural rosy pink coloring, the candy is said to be wildly different from traditional milk, dark, or even white chocolate in both flavor and appearance. Despite having no fruit flavoring (which might be expected, considering its hue), Barry Callebaut has said that their new chocolate has a smooth, berry-like taste.

The inventors of the chocolate have described the product’s coming launch as an attempt to “satisfy a new consumer need found among millennials – hedonistic indulgence,” fulfilling that desire simply by being exciting and different.

The attractive color definitely doesn’t hurt the candy’s chances in this market, as young consumers have a history of embracing colorful foods. From rainbow bagels to black ice cream to Unicorn Frappuccinos, snacks that have a bold aesthetic are an in-demand commodity in the Instagram age.

Some have questioned whether or not it’s a good idea to mess with such a classic and beloved treat. The love of chocolate seems to be such a universal feeling that is has practically become cliché, and many consumers have a strong emotional investment in the sweet. From the Mayans to today’s trick-or-treaters, countless generations of enthusiasts from around the world have indulged and been delighted by the confection.

 

Chocolate has been around for centuries (early evidence of chocolate consumption has been dated as far back as 1900 B.C.), but the current trifecta of milk, dark, and white chocolate is a far more recent development than you might expect.

White chocolate was first launched by Nestle in Europe in the 1930s. It purportedly originated as a means of using up excess cocoa butter, as the product is made with a very high cocoa butter content. Today, cocoa butter must account for at least 20% of a white chocolate bar for it to legally qualify as such.

It wasn’t until 1948 that Nestle brought white chocolate to the U.S. on a mass scale, beginning with the almond-filled Alpine White chocolate bar. The bar was well-received and was available to consumers until the 1990s, when it was eventually discontinued.

Nestle was also involved in the creation of milk chocolate in the mid-1870s, as Henri Nestle, who invented powdered milk, helped inspire his friend and neighbor Daniel Peter to start adding milk to chocolate bars. Together they formulated the first successful milk chocolate recipe, which would go on to become a sensation.

Chocolate bars themselves had only been invented forty years prior to Nestle and Peter’s breakthrough, in 1847. Joseph Fry, in discovering a chocolate formulation that could be molded and would hold its shape, brought “eating chocolate” into the world, which had previously only known of chocolate as an ingredient in beverages.

All of this is to say that such a radical shake-up in the chocolate world is not as far-fetched as it may initially sound. We don’t yet know when ruby chocolate will be made commercially available, but it is entirely possible that it could change the game in ways we can’t yet imagine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 Trends from the 2017 Summer Fancy Food Show

 

According to the Specialty Food Association, the Summer Fancy Food Show is North America’s largest trade show for the specialty food industry. As such, it is the perfect place to scope out what sorts of new tastes are being explored by brands, and what trends are emerging as a result. Here are the top seven flavor trends that we noticed after attending last week:

 

1) Meat-Free

 

From eggless mayonnaise to fish-less fish cakes (which are made up primarily of beans), vegan products were out in full force this year. As more consumers become aware of the environmental ramifications of meat cultivation, meatless alternatives are gaining a lot of attention.

With the push for more protein-rich goods that are free of animal products, we were surprised at how few brands were incorporating insects into their food. Known to be full of protein, not unpleasantly flavored, and far more eco-friendly than livestock, insect-enriched products would have seemingly fit right in at this show. It feels like every year we say that consumers are close to embracing the idea of eating insects, yet once again it appears that the industry still isn’t feeling the love.

2) Veggie Snacking

 

 

Not so surprisingly, vegetable-based snacks continue to serve as a substitute for fatty products like potato chips and pretzels. Crunchy brussels sprouts, popped lotus seeds, seaweed crisps, and beet crackers all offer consumers easy ways to bring more vegetables into their diet without sacrificing snacktime.

Notably, vegetables are now being combined with more sweet treats – Biena, for example, won a Sofi prize for their roasted chickpeas covered in caramel and chocolate. Several other brands showed up with some variation of sweetened sesame bars, which could be an alternative to granola.

3) Coconut

Coconut sugar, coconut clusters, even coconut-flavored cheese – everywhere you turned, somebody had figured out a new thing to do with coconuts. Many of these products were honored with Sofi awards, particularly those that are intended for snacking, like World Finer Foods’ GoCo Crunchy Coconut Bites.

 

4) Spiced and Textured Beverages

 

We first anticipated the spiced drink trend back when Pepsico announced their limited edition Pepsi Fire flavor. Our prediction was confirmed when the most beloved non-Starbucks drink on Instagram, Blk. Water, came to the Fancy Food Show with somewhat savory new flavors like “Spicy Black Cherry” and “Peach Mango Basil”. One of the busiest booths at the show was relative newcomer H2rOse, a beverage brand that infuses water with roses and saffron.

The show also featured a range of textured beverages, with several aloe drink, puree, and chia seed drink brands in attendance. Aloe-based beverages are often a little thicker than a traditional juice, with variations in “globiness” depending on brand. As soda sales slip, unique drinks like these have an opportunity to expand their market.

5) Beets

 

 

Last year, the Los Angeles Times reported that beets were going to be the next major superfood, and the trend has continued into 2017. Not only do beets give products an exciting, eye-catching color – which is helpful for standing out at an event like the Fancy Food Show, which features thousands upon thousands of options – they also are rich in antioxidants and nutrients. Love Beets came to the show with a variety of beet products, including organic beet juice and a mixable beet powder.

 

6) Cold Soup

Tio Gazpacho and Fawen are just two of the cold, drinkable soup brands that presented at this year’s show. With the beverage industry starting to pull away from sugar and playing with savory flavors, it makes sense that vegetable-heavy drinks would shine.

 

7) Allergy-Sensitive Products

In addition to all of the meat-free products at the show, a number of brands came with gluten-free, dairy-free, and nut-free snacks and beverages for intolerant consumers. New Jersey company No Whey! Foods presented an assortment of popular candy alternatives, like “Pea NOT Cups”, chocolate cups filled with sunflower seed butter rather than peanut butter. Many of the products in this category are also vegan and/or kosher, and incorporate other trendy ingredients like coconuts and agave.

 

 

Why a Tire Company Determines What We Eat

If you care about food – particularly gourmet food – it’s likely that you’ve at least heard of Michelin stars. If you haven’t, you are probably still familiar with Michelin as a company, which produces both a restaurant guide and tires.

themichelinguide

If you didn’t know that the tire manufacturer Michelin reviewed food, then it probably comes as a pretty big surprise that they visit select restaurants and award them zero, one, two, or three “Michelin stars” based on the cuisine. But they do, and their opinion matters a lot. Like, a lot. To many chefs, their opinion matters the most.

When you learn the history, it does make some kind of sense. The Michelin Guide was first published in 1900 as a hospitality guide for French motorists. Michelin is a French company, and cars were still a relatively new invention at that time, so encouraging road trips within the country served as a way to boost business. Eventually, the guide evolved into what it is today, which is a booklet that focuses exclusively on fine dining.  Anonymous reviewers that work for Michelin covertly visit restaurants around the world and judge the food based on a series of specific criteria. There is a first round of criteria that the restaurant must meet before the food can even be reviewed, namely:

  • The restaurant must be located in an area that is covered by Michelin. In America, that means that it has to be in New York City, Chicago, Las Vegas, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Washington D.C., East Bay and Wine Country, or Silicon Valley. Former “Michelin Inspector” Pascal Remy once alleged that the entirety of the United States is covered by just seven reviewers, making it all the more difficult to receive a star.
  • The restaurant must have received a sufficient amount of buzz that Michelin deems it worthy of the company’s time.

There is a great deal of mystery surrounding how exactly the Inspectors evaluate the food. There are, however, several key traits that we do know are valued, including:

  • The quality of the ingredients used
  • The chef’s flavor and cooking techniques, and his or her ability to infuse the meal with their own personality
  • Consistency between visits, which Remy stated occur every three to four years

That last point is the most controversial among chefs, as many feel that rewarding consistency inhibits creativity and experimentation. There is a general feeling that once a restaurant receives a star, they can never change the menu, for fear of losing their star, never gaining another, or disappointing the now-skyrocketed expectations of customers.  Because of this, some chefs do not want any stars, and a very small number of restaurants have even “returned” them to Michelin.

michelin2

Even among chefs that do respect the star-rating system, the guide has been accused of fostering an unhealthy obsession. Gordon Ramsey reportedly cried when his New York City restaurant lost its two stars in 2013, comparing it to losing a girlfriend. When famed French chef Bernard Loiseau committed suicide in 2003, many believed that he was overcome with anxiety regarding rumors that he was about to lose his three stars.

The 2011 documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi chronicled Jiro Ono, considered to be the greatest sushi chef in the world, and his three-starred restaurant in Tokyo. In Roger Ebert’s review of the film, he noted that “you realize the tragedy of Jiro Ono’s life is that there are not, and will never be, four stars.” For chefs like Ono, perfection has become a measurable goal, and it can be difficult to find a path forward after it has been reached.

jirodreams

Still, for the most part, Michelin stars tend to do a lot of good for the restaurants that earn them. It has been described as a “life-changing experience” for chefs, especially if the restaurant is lucky enough to get all three stars. Plates at a Michelin-reviewed establishment can go for hundreds of dollars, and chefs at two-star restaurants often bring home six-figure incomes in exchange for their mastery. Fine dining is an especially cutthroat field, and Michelin’s opinion can make or break a chef’s entire career.

The Making of Our 2012 Holiday Gift – Brand & Package Design

For our 2012 holiday gift to our clients, we decided to design and deliver mini carrot cakes by the dozens. From creating the logo, to drawing up the box and making sure each color blended perfectly, to even photographing the freshly baked treats, we left no detail untouched.  End of the day, we created our very own brand and package design.  And if you weren’t lucky enough to receive one of these all-natural packages, keep an eye out for our next post where we’ll unveil the finished product.

Works Design 2012 Holiday Gift - Our Very Own Brand & Package Design

Works Design 2012 Holiday Gift - Our Very Own Brand & Package Design

Works Design 2012 Holiday Gift - Our Very Own Brand & Package Design

Works Design 2012 Holiday Gift - Our Very Own Brand & Package Design

Works Design 2012 Holiday Gift - Our Very Own Brand & Package Design

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Nearly 30, Wendy Looks Younger than Ever

 

Wendy’s was fist opened in 1969 and has undergone only minor updates to it’s logo since. Last week, the third largest fast-food burger company rolled out a refreshed logo and brand design after the previous one stood for nearly thirty years. While maintaining much of its value when it comes to the pigtails, the company has chosen to move away from the antiquated typography and to move toward a more modern and inviting hand-drawn type. Although the execution leaves much to be desired, its evolution and purpose is clear: to appeal to a new generation of customers with slightly more sophisticated palettes who tend to be more calorie conscious. Reflecting these values, Wendy’s has also released their vision for an updated restaurant experience, seen below.

 

 

Looks like we’ll all be eating our Double Baconator in relative style.

 

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