The Branding of Lab Grown Meat

Screen Shot 2016-12-07 at 1.52.17 PMLaboratory-grown meat is projected to hit grocery store shelves within the next few years, and the benefits are easy to understand. Meat that has been grown in a petri dish requires no animal slaughter, produces little waste, and results in the emission of 90% less greenhouse gases, among other environmental bonuses. The risk of contamination or undetected bacterial exposure is dramatically reduced, and, purportedly, it tastes basically the same as “real” meat.

There is one major problem that plagues researchers and developers, however – how to get people to actually eat it.

People are just naturally squeamish about eating meat that did not come from an animal, although it is technically generated from livestock cells. This is an especially stressful time for lab-grown meat to enter the market; all packaged food trends point towards more “natural” ingredients (real sugars, no chemical additives or antibiotics, etc.), a movement that is unlikely to relax any time soon. If General Mills can’t even get parents to buy cereal that has red #40 dye, how will manufacturers get them to buy chicken nuggets that were never part of a chicken?Screen Shot 2016-12-07 at 4.48.11 PMThe answer, of course, is branding. The lab-grown meat industry is very aware of public perception, and, as a result, has invented a new term that consumers may find easier to stomach: “clean meat”.

For example, Clara Foods, which produces chicken-less egg whites from genetically modified yeast, does not call its product “artificial” egg whites – instead, they use the much nicer-sounding “clean egg whites”. Technically accurate words like “fermented” and “cultured” probably will not be featured the branding of these types of goods, and anything too sci-fi or futuristic is unlikely to make a positive impression on potential buyers. “Clean meat” plays to a lot of traits that consumers are already looking for, as the name seems to allude to health and physical wellness, as well as environmental friendliness.Screen Shot 2016-12-07 at 1.51.10 PMThe “clean meat” angle is a controversial one – for starters, companies that work with and rely on livestock resent the implication that animal meat is somehow unclean, and claim that there is no reason why both animal agriculture and “cellular” agriculture cannot both be part of the plan to move to more sustainable meat consumption practices. Some have pointed out that past pushes for sterile, manufactured foods have lead to unforeseen health consequences, which the “clean meat” label fails to suggest. An example that has been cited is the movement for factory-produced enriched white bread in the early twentieth century, which is probably at least partially responsible for today’s mass gluten intolerance problem.  Critics are concerned that an overstatement of the benefits of “clean meat” could lead to reliance on a product whose long-term effects cannot be fully understood until after it has been on the market for years, and that this new name goes too far in the opposite direction of public suspicion.

Again, consumers have a few years to get used to the idea of lab-grown meat before it will be available in stores. We will just have to wait and see whether or not a fancy rebranding effort will be what is necessary to get customers to bite, and if the environmental impact will be enough to see a change of public opinion.

The History of Holiday Flavors

Screen Shot 2016-11-23 at 10.11.54 AMThere’s no way around it — 2016 has been a strange year.

Olympic athletes swam in questionable green pools. Clowns terrorized the nation for over a month. Pringles has three different dessert-flavored chips out at once… Screen Shot 2016-11-23 at 9.47.43 AM

Photo from Pringles’ official twitter

Pecan Pie, Sugar Cookie, and Salted Caramel. Count ‘em, that’s three sweet Pringles for the holiday season – limited edition, of course, as are most gimmicky flavored snacks.

Now that we are about midway through the season in which everything from chips to ChapStick has to have some pumpkin spice/gingerbread/peppermint variation, we can’t help but wonder…how did we get to this point?

Oreos are probably the treat best associated with limited edition flavors. After all, their experiments in novelty cookies are not just bound by holidays – they play the game all year long, with nearly ten new selections produced in 2016 alone (including Swedish Fish and Lemon Twist). Consumers could first buy a limited edition Oreo in 1985, when the company debuted the decidedly mild and normal Mint Crème.

Since then, it has been the Wild West in the snack flavoring world. Most companies seem to stick to the holiday season for major shakeups, and all traditional taste conventions go flying out the window the minute the temperature starts dropping. It isn’t just savory foods going sweet – in 1994, Jones Soda put out Turkey and Gravy cola (imagine the possibilities, Pringles!), and it was only a few years ago that Accoutrements put out a Thanksgiving gumball pack that included turkey-flavored gumballs.

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Photo from Amazon

Of course, the most pervasive and beloved flavor of the season is pumpkin spice. The first reference to pumpkin spice is believed to have come from the 1796 cookbook American Cookery by Amelia Simmons, and the recipe called for molasses, allspice and ginger. McCormick’s and similar brands shortened the name of their spice blend from “pumpkin pie spice” to just “pumpkin spice” as early as the 1960s, after the blend had been on the market for a decade. Trader Joe’s began carrying seasonal pumpkin goods in the mid-90’s, and as the flavor continues to get more and more popular, their selection grows – there will be ten more pumpkin-themed items for sale this year than last year. Pop-Tarts, cream cheese, vodka, cereal, bagels, coffee creamer, popcorn, even salsa and hummus – all can be found in a pumpkin spice variety this fall.

Starbucks is largely responsible for the phenomenon, as their pumpkin spice latte, which has been around for thirteen years, is by far their most popular seasonal item. They have sold over two hundred million “PSLs” since the drink debuted, earning hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue for the company. Social media has played a huge role in this, so much so that the drink has its own separate verified Twitter account: @TheRealPSL.

This is not to say that seasonal flavors are all about the traditional – at the height of the cupcake craze of the early 2010s, Target released a popular “holiday milk” flavored like chocolate red velvet. So there is definitely room for brands to incorporate trends into their seasonal flavor selections, and we should expect to see more creativity in the coming years. After all, 1796-2016 is a long reign for pumpkin spice. If Pringles has given us any indication, future tastes can be unexpected.

5 Emerging Packaging Design Trends

While each client and project are different, knowing what design trends are more popular can get you going in the right direction and will give you an idea of how consumers will interact with the product. Consider mobile-engaged packaging, personalized packaging, and digital print to create more personalized experiences for consumers. To engage consumers on a personal level and provide them with an experience through packaging, consider the following packaging design trends.

Simplicity

t-shirt-packaging-design-the-t-shirt-01Consumers are overwhelmed with the choices available to them, so sometimes, it’s best to just keep things simple. Clean, clear labeling and minimalist packaging can help to get the point across quickly, with no fluff. It also creates brand transparency and increases buyers’ confidence. When consumers are looking for products that can simplify their lives, they are attracted to minimal packaging that is simple (not boring) and instantly answers the questions they are asking. By identifying what the consumer needs and expressing how your product can fulfill that need (in no uncertain terms), your packaging will be more powerful and instill trust with your audience.

Geometric Shapes

jeannieburnside_meld_5Screen-Shot-2016-01-15-at-2.50.19-PM-768x321Geometric patterns and shapes are visually appealing and can fit nearly any product. Using familiar colors and shapes can provide a simplistic approach that reaches consumers in a nostalgic way.

Vintage

038a433ff8e7485a5846c156265aea80static1.squarespace-2Old-fashioned packaging design focuses on the good ole’ days. Modernizing old design trends and presenting vintage packaging, with emphasis on calligraphy and letterpress, will relate your packaging to something of higher value.

Enhanced Shelf Life

05967f81b443a987d367f4763a7ba606Most designers believe in the standard that your packaging should be able to stay on the shelf for approximately three to five years. However, it can remain on your customer’s home shelves for just as long. That’s why it’s important to design unique packaging that looks good both in the store and at home. By accounting for how it will look on the shelves in the store, you can attract more new customers. By accounting for how it will look on the shelves at home, you can keep your current customers satisfied. It also encourages consumers to leave the packaging out on the counters more often (instead of hiding them in the cabinet), which results in free advertising for anyone who sees the item.

Sustainable Packaging

c8371dabd11828690cc7e2df6231717apd-19Sustainable packaging offers a more environmentally friendly option, which can still be functional and beautiful. It can also empower social consciousness overall. Choosing green, socially responsible packaging is good for your business, the environment, and your bottom dollar. Successful sustainable packaging needs to be less disposable and have the smallest possible impact on the environment. This can include using recycled materials to produce the packaging and/or encouraging customers to repurpose the packaging after the contents are gone.

Have you noticed other emerging design trends that we missed?

[INFOGRAPHIC] Branding the POTUS: Donald Trump vs Hillary Clinton

Political branding can be a little stale, and often follows the same tired template. That is not the case, however, when the politicians involved are running for President of the United States. We were inspired by some of the things we’ve seen throughout the 2016 Presidential campaign, and we wanted to share some of the branding highlights and lowlights for each of the candidates. Just like their campaigns, the branding of Donald Trump vs Hillary Clinton has been truly extraordinary, and below are some of thoughts that are worth sharing. donald trump vs hillary clinton branding infographic

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Brand Stories: How Warby Parker Clearly Saw the Finish Line

Sometimes, overthinking is key when it comes to branding. While some companies launch as quickly as possible, others take a very deliberate approach to branding. One such example is Warby Parker.5c4190dba9c25b876e9e0a45bb4542bd

Deliberate Approach to Branding

Warby Parker was founded in 2010 by four friends at Wharton. They sell prescription eyeglasses and sunglasses online and offer a limited number of physical offices throughout the United States. The idea sprouted from the co-founders recognizing that the industry was monopolized by large firms like Luxottica, making it nearly impossible for consumers to find affordable, quality glasses.

Co-founder, David Gilboa, said, “We spent about a year and a half from when we came up with the idea to when we launched, and a huge part of that was building a brand we could believe in.” Co-founder, Neil Blumenthal, actually said that most startups underinvest in branding.

Most investors would agree that they are “more disciplined about brand than any other entrepreneur.” The founders agree that when starting out, you can’t underestimate “the importance of really defining who you are and what you stand for and having a very distinct point of view.”

They carefully explored every detail of the brand design. In fact, they explored roughly 2,000 names before settling on Warby Parker, which combined two names from Jack Kerouac’s journals (Zagg Parker and Warby Pepper). They tested the name on about 1,500 of their friends to see how they reacted to it. Blumenthal recalled that “the fact that it resonated with people sort of built in credibility.”

Even the price involved a lot of thought. They set the threshold at $100, but $99 sounded discounted and “Visually, it’s not that pretty.” Blumenthal recalled that “$95 is deliberate, visually; it’s more appealing.” While it means less revenue, he found that “You sometimes have to make tradeoffs to do something creatively and beautifully versus always just going for profits. In this case we’re trading $4, but we think that the upside is bigger.”warby-parker-bird-caseThe white and light blue branding is inspired by the blue-footed booby bird. They were also inspired by Zappos’ customer service, Apple’s focus on simplicity, Nike’s brand clarity, and Patagonia’s pro-social initiatives. enhanced-buzz-5450-1364308740-6-1WPKarlie2They’ve also had highly successful brand partnerships, with celebrities like Karlie Kloss and Ryan Gosling, as well as with productions like the Man of Steel movie.

How a Mistake Turned Into a Triumph

warby-parkerWhile the founders came up with the idea for Warby Parker in 2008, they weren’t planning on launching until March 2010. GQ contacted Warby Parker for a story that would publish in the March issue (before Warby Parker had even officially launched), so Warby Parker decided that this would be their official launch date. They later found out that the magazine would hit newsstands on February 15, so the founders realized they had to push up the launch date. The site went live on February 15 and within 48 hours, the orders came pouring in so quickly that they had to temporarily suspend the home try-on program.

In the article, GQ dubbed them “the Netflix of eyewear”, leading to a waitlist of 20,000 people. In only three weeks, the company hit its first-year sales target.

Tell a Compelling Story

Warby Parker has leaned on telling engaging stories to reach a new audience. One such story occurred in 2011, when Warby Parker found a way to participate in NY Fashion Week, even though they couldn’t afford to. They invited a number of fashion editors to a “hush mob” at the public library. There, about 30 models were reading from bright blue books, dawning the latest Warby Parker designs. Every editor that attended wrote about the event.warby-barker-1-600x587Other compelling, shareable stories include Warby Parker’s 2,000+ one-to-one video answers and April Fool’s jokes (such as launching glasses for dogs). Their social mission is also highly shareable. They donate a pair of glasses to someone in need for every pair purchased. To date, they’ve donated more than a million pairs of glasses.

Trailblazing at its Finest

warby-home-try-on-600x306Most people seemed hesitant about buying glasses online. This led to Warby Parker becoming one of the first to introduce a home try-on program, where consumers can try on five frames at home, at no cost. They confirmed that people who try items are 50% likelier to buy. They were also one of the first to go direct to consumers online, rather than relying on in-person purchases. They design glasses in-house and sell only directly to consumers, which allows them to lower the cost of prescription eyewear to an affordable $95 per pair. Today, more than 50% of their traffic is driven by word-of-mouth referrals, proving that when you get the branding right in the beginning, people are sure to notice.

5 Designs We Love: Subscription Box Packaging

The subscription box industry has increased in popularity by 3,000% in the last three years, so subscriptions have upped their game when it comes to both the box’s contents and packaging. Strong subscription box packaging can inspire loyalty and add to the overall box experience. Along with standing out visually, each box must also take care to ensure that the contents will arrive at your door in perfect condition.

The outer packaging is the first thing that subscribers see when the box arrives (and while it sits outside of your door), so it’s crucial that the space is well utilized. In essence, it’s traveling ad space. Each of the boxes we have highlighted below has found a way to create unique, out-of-the-box packaging designs that help them stand apart from the rest.

Loot Crateloot-crate-march-2015-box00514-525x350Loot Crate features fun packaging, aimed at gamers, nerds, geeks, and techies. The packaging is different every month and is part of the fun. Some boxes feature a game board on the inside, some correlate with the box’s contents.

According to Chris Davis, CEO of Loot Crate: “We didn’t want to have just some generic shipping box – we wanted to create an emotional connection.” He stated that the packaging is “a direct reflection on our brand. It shows our attention to detail; it’s really cool and sleek-looking (black exterior and bright orange interior), and is a key part of what we do.” To encourage subscriber sharing, they “designed the box internally, and intentionally included ways for our subscribers to connect with us and with each other. The sides of our shipping box have Loot Crate hashtags, and we added a Konami code (probably one of the most memorable experiences for those of us that played Contra–or at least heard about it) on the bottom, as well as a QR code on the back. The codes take users to “secret” video and content.”

MantryScreen Shot 2016-09-22 at 5.51.48 PMMantry’s box for foodies designed their packaging to suit the modern man. The contents arrive in a wooden crate with the tops nailed shut. After prying open the box and enjoying the contents, the crate can then be repurposed later and suits basically any decor.

SvbscriptionRoAndCo_Svbscription_V1_01-1299-xxx_q85Svbscription-The-Green-Soccer-Journal-1Svbscription-W1-WomanEverything Svbscription does is revolved around style and design. The luxury subscription box includes their branding on almost everything included in the box. The typography, packaging, and logo design were created for the modern man by New York’s RoAndCo Studio. The contents inside are also geared towards those who appreciate design. RoAndCo explained that they “packaged the items in natural wooden crates, nailed them shut and wrapped them in brown kraft paper for shipping.” Each quarter, the packaging changes to fit the box’s theme and content.

GrazeScreen Shot 2016-09-22 at 5.01.54 PMGraze designed their packaging to tell a story. Shelly Huang, Head of Marketing at Graze, said that “the box is one part of the journey” and they take efforts to put a lot of “love and care” into the box and packaging. They use as little cardboard as possible for the outer packaging and the snacks are individually packaged in small sustainable containers. The recyclable packaging and containers can also be reused for different things (Graze suggests using them as bird feeders, herb planters, drawer separators, or arts and crafts organizers).

HelloFreshc700x420hello-fresh-december-2015-divider-720x540Tofu-ingredients-640x640HelloFresh sends individually wrapped, pre-measured ingredients in large square boxes. They are usually preserved with freezer packs and include recyclable packaging. The simple packaging includes stickers that can be viewed from all angles, stating which recipe the ingredients are intended for. The stickers are color coded to match the ingredients inside, so you can easily find what you need to prepare your meal. The outer packaging is intended to look nice and eye-catching in any fridge, while still preserving the ingredients inside for at least three days. The 2-piece box has a finger hole for easy opening and the lid can be used as a trash box while the bottom houses the ingredients.

Adrian Frenzel, Co-CEO of HelloFresh, said that “packaging is enabling.” They are constantly improving and testing their packaging, so that the ingredients arrive at your door in perfect condition every time. The packaging and boxes are even tested out on the exec’s wives, so they get firsthand input from busy moms.

Retro Packaging Is All the Rage

Today’s world is fast, non-stop, and all about constant communication and information gathered through our phones and tablets. But even in this modern, technology-driven world, sometimes looking back to simpler times is the best way to draw customers, and that’s where retro packaging comes in.

Retro packaging hits people’s sense of nostalgia, and also implies longevity. When a well-known company brings back old designs, or designs a new look that looks vintage, it reminds people that the brand has been around a long time. For example, M&Ms are marking their 75th anniversary and is rolling out several designs inspired by its packaging over the years, but at the same time are also introducing new flavors of the beloved chocolate candy.

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New companies are also savvy enough to take advantage of the retro look. In 2012 for instance, Small Town Brewery, in Wauconda, Illinois, introduced Not Your Father’s Root Beer, an alcoholic beer with a root beer taste, with packaging featuring a man dressed in 19th-century clothing. Other features of the logo included a barrel and old-style fonts. Even the cardboard container for the beer’s six-pack is designed to look like a small wooden crate.

“Retro packaging and labeling carry the appeal of quirkiness and nostalgia, and they project authenticity to shoppers,” says Bruce D. Sanders, a consumer psychologist, retail consultant and author of “Sell Well: What Really Moves Your Shoppers.”

He notes that during a three-week stretch in 2011, Heinz Ketchup re-introduced its eight-sided glass bottle from the 1990s; Hostess Cakes used retro packaging; and PepsiCo rolled out throwback versions of Pepsi and Mountain Dew.

“But trends do have a freshness date,” he says. “The special edition of Heinz Ketchup disappeared after five months. The Hostess Cakes items made their Brigadoon-style appearance for one month.”

The bad economy that has marked much of the 2000s is one reason for all of this looking-back, according to Sanders.

“Nostalgia is more attractive to shoppers during times of uncertainty, such as from economic downturns or social isolation,” he says. “Consumer behavior researchers find that when people are feeling lonely, they get interested in nostalgia. In one study, when consumers were made to feel socially uncertain by the experimental manipulation, they became more likely to prefer automobile makes, food brands, TV shows, movies, and even shower soaps which reminded them of their personal history.”

He adds that some brands are “perennially retro,” such as L.L. Bean and Restoration Hardware.

“They aim to project authenticity via continuity,” Sanders says. “A retro image is associated in shoppers’ minds with a store being in business for a long time, carrying trustworthy merchandise and staffed with reliable people.”

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Isaac Cohen, Chairman of the JNCO clothing line, says the company has embraced its retro roots.

“Back in the ’90s, JNCO was an international sensation thanks to its comfortable wide-legged jeans and non-conformist philosophy that represented the best of retro SoCal culture,” Cohen says. “When we revived the brand in 2015, we tried to reinvent the brand and the style of our clothes to match the modern trends. This approach yielded moderate success, but after answering the pleas from our followers asking for a return to our ’90s styles, our revival really took off. For our die-hard follower base, our retro products and packaging have worked to our advantage and helped strengthen our overall brand.”

Randy Gunter is the owner of the Gunter Agency, a marketing, advertising and design firm. His company acquired a consumer company, McNess Consumer Products, last October. McNess has been selling home, health and cleaning products since the early 20th century, and Gunter is emphasizing the company’s long history with its packaging.

“McNess has been around since 1908 and we are in the process of changing some of the packaging, but everything is with a retro design,” Gunter says. “When we took over, there was a lot of inconsistency. There are still some products that need to be changed yet, but we’re doing that when we need to replace inventory… We’re in the process of also bringing back several old products that had been discontinued.

So when it comes to retro packaging, you could say that everything old is new again.

Packaging for Millennials

Millennials are the next wave of influential shoppers. Born between 1981 and 2000, studies show they will be 50 percent of the workforce by the year 2020 and will spend more than $200 billion annually, starting in 2017. Millennials are loyal to brands that treat them well, offer new experiences, and are aligned with their beliefs. That’s why it’s important that packaging appeals to this generation in the best way.

Joseph Anthony, a millennial marketing expert and CEO of HERO Group, has worked with some of the world’s leading brands such as Pfizer, Nintendo, Pepsi and Nike, says Millennials look for a personal connection to their preferred brands and are more likely to buy a product if it makes them feel special through this personal connection or the idea of exclusivity.

A new report from Mintel, Marketing to Millennials, revealed limiting the availability of a product creates a unique purchase experience in which brands effectively satisfy the pronounced desire of Millennials to have the latest, greatest and most exclusive products. It notes that offering a limited-time-only rollout of personalized packaging has the ability to create unique connections with consumers who might be mulling a purchase.UnknownDigital Plays a Role

The role of packaging in the digital space plays more of a brand-building role than in traditional brick and mortar shopping environments. In social media, packaging may not have to do the job of shelf impact and differentiation, but there’s an opportunity to play with brand elements in a simpler, more iconic way that makes consumers want to share across their social channels.

For example, packaging that includes quick-response (QR) codes right on the label gives consumers immediate access to a community that is also participating and purchasing the same products as they are.

Recent examples of brands doing this include Coca Cola, Frito-Lay’s and Heinz.

Lorrie Frear, an associate professor in package design and packaging science at the Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, N.Y., says that when communicating information about a brand, it is critical that brand managers and designers consider mobile as a key component of the entire brand strategy and not as an add-on

“Consumers use devices in making buying decisions quickly, so be sure that information is easy to find on the packaging and not small or hidden,” she says. “The user experience is critical to acquiring return customers, so be sure that any interaction takes less than a few seconds to accomplish and that the destination is reached within three clicks.”UnknownIn Vogue

A big trend in packaging with Millennials in mind is reseal. Over the last few years, the snack aisle has seen more and more packaging with reseal tabs to allow consumers to eat a handful and then reseal the packaging for later.

There are a few main benefits to this type of packaging, particularly for Millennials. It’s convenient and portable for their busy lifestyles; it promotes healthy snacking as many of these items are pre-cut, peeled fruit; and the food stays fresher longer using a moisture vapor film barrier.

Ryan Lupberger, founder of Cleancult, which delivers non-toxic laundry pods, designed his packaging with Millennials in mind. The company’s market research has shown that Millennials want to buy responsible products, but are actually 23 percent less likely to purchase a “green” brand.

“We saw that Millennials wanted two things. They wanted packaging that could be recycled, but they also wanted this packaging to be durable and design focused,” he says. “Most were not interested in packaging that signified it was cheaper or just eco-friendly. They care about purchasing products that combine design, convenience, and responsible packaging. They are not willing to sacrifice one of these things for a more eco-friendly package.”

Millennials also seem to care about humor in the opening experience of the packaging. Companies like Naturebox and Dollar Shave Club have done well because they combined all three things with a focus on humor.

Sustainable Packaging

While packaging design is crucial to set your product apart from competitors, a recent Asia Pulp & Paper study found that packaging appearance, including design, is less of a factor for purchasing than one might think. According to the research, Millennials are placing less focus on packaging design and demanding more functional and sustainable packaging. In fact, only 21 percent of Millennials surveyed indicated design as the most important feature when making purchasing decisions.

Reducing the volume of packaging – and the types of materials used – continues to be a good way to improve functionality and the sustainability of a product’s packaging and a goal of many companies around the globe. It not only makes sense from a business standpoint but also from a sustainability and customer relations standpoint.

Companies are discovering that one way to ensure and build customer loyalty is to prevent situations that may cause a delay in opening their packages. The simple solution is to utilize packaging that can be easily opened – no tools required. Paper-related products are not only the most frustration-free type of packaging, but they’re also one of the most recyclable and sustainable at this point.

Creative Titans: Frank Gehry, The Da Vinci of Architects

Frank-Gehry-v1Born in 1929, Frank Gehry is one of the most celebrated architects of our time. Commonly referred to as the “Da Vinci of Architects”, the Pritzer Prize-winning architect is responsible for some of the most important works of contemporary architecture.

His passion for architecture stemmed from childhood when he built play cities using items from his grandfather’s hardware store. His designs have a style of their own, but maintain the same bold, postmodern shapes and fluid design, even when it comes to his line of jewelry for Tiffany & Co.

He received his degree at the University of Southern California’s School of Architecture, where he would later serve as a board member and professor. Arianna Huffington described the outspoken architect as “the friendly genius” of our time.

Popular Work

Vanity Fair asked 90 of the world’s leading architects, teachers, and critics to vote on the most significant structure built to date and Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum received three times as many votes as the second-place building received. This led to Vanity Fair deeming him “the most important architect of our age”. Along with his architectural works of art, Gehry is responsible for designing unique jewelry, furniture, liquor bottles, trophies, and even headwear for Lady Gaga.

Many of his buildings have become world-renowned attractions, including the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain. One of his most popular and renowned works is his own private residence in Santa Monica, CA, which he redesigned in 1978. It was one of his first examples of deconstructivism in architecture. The award-winning design consists of an existing bungalow, which was wrapped in angular volumes and suburban materials like plywood, aluminum, corrugated metal, glass, and chain-link fencing. Even the furniture within is made of cardboard.ScreenShot6537His likeness and famed private residence were even featured on The Simpsons in 2005, where he voiced the character. While he was the first architect to ever appear on The Simpsons, the guest appearance is something he would later regret. In the episode, he is inspired by a crumpled piece of paper, which many viewers believed was his true inspiration for the LA Disney Concert Hall. In fact, his designs require a very lengthy, inspired process. For instance, his firm, Gehry Partners, begins each new endeavor with a Digital Project, which is a sophisticated 3D computer modeling program, to work through the details.

At age 86, he is now overseeing philanthropic and commercial projects. The most notable project he is currently working on is the restoration of the Los Angeles River, with plans to convert the 51-mile concrete structure to a public outdoor space and tourist destination.

Design Strategy

Gehry works to create buildings with movement and feeling, unlike any before them. He has created a unique form of architecture, commonly referred to as liquid architecture. He works to disrupt expectations by using non-traditional materials like chain-link fencing and metal siding to make one-of-a-kind masterpieces.

While he knows European art history and contemporary sculpture and painting, he strives for uniqueness. His earliest educational influences involved modernism, which can still be seen in his ultra modern work today.

He revolutionized more than just architectural design; he transformed the relationship a building has to its city.  According to Gehry, “Architecture should speak of its time and place, but yearn for timelessness.”

Gehry found that the key to success is complete creative freedom in a project. As he put it, “I don’t know why people hire architects and then tell them what to do.”

Busch + NASCAR = Awesome Branding and Packaging

Busch Light No. 4 Car

Anheuser-Busch is creating limited-edition packaging throughout the 2016 NASCAR season and celebrating the brand’s return to the sport of racing by leveraging its packaging assets via its racing platform.

“Busch obviously has a great track record and strong roots in NASCAR and the sport of racing overall. We’re thrilled to be back,” says Chelsea Phillips, senior director, US Value Brands, Anheuser-Busch. “Our marketing efforts already focused on our long-running association with outdoor pursuits, especially those who enjoy hunting and fishing. We’re able to leverage the racing platform to amplify these initiatives, taking advantage of the natural synergies that take place across our interests in NASCAR, hunting and fishing.”

For example, the paint schemes for Kevin Harvick’s No. 4 Chevrolet are heavily inspired by the look of its iconic can. Every time Harvick’s car is seen—whether it’s during a race or on social media—fans make an instant connection to the Busch product.

Harvick has been very involved in the process since Day One. The goal was to create highly visual cans that would resonate with the company’s core target—passionate outdoorsmen and fishermen. The cans display some of the most popular species of fish that are found in our nation’s lakes and streams.Busch Fishing Angler + Trophy Cans_“When we approached Kevin with the idea of using the No. 4 car as a platform to launch our fishing campaign, he was instantly on board,” Phillips says. “He’s an avid outdoorsmen himself, so it just made perfect sense and feels super authentic to us.”

Overall, Busch’s “Here’s to Earning It” tagline and overall brand persona are a perfect fit for NASCAR, and this sponsorship has resonated strongly with racing enthusiasts.

“Due to our brand’s deep racing roots and dedication to outdoor pursuits, we’re able to put some eye-catching designs on the track on race day,” Phillips says. “In addition to the standard Busch and Busch Light paint schemes, we fielded a Busch fish car paint scheme at Talladega, and we’ll have a retro car for the Southern 500 at Darlington in September, reminiscent of Cale Yarborough’s iconic 1979 Daytona 500 car.”

Busch-Fishing-Meets-RacingSince its initial design, the branding and packaging has evolved. For instance, it’s cut down on the number of species featured on the packaging so that folks can attempt to collect all varieties. Specifically regarding the limited-edition packaging—which inspired the look of the Busch fish car that ran at Talladega—all Busch and Busch Light packaging was converted beginning May 8 to feature one of four unique fish cans, or the ultimate prize: the brand new gold trophy can.